Monday, May 30, 2005

Blues for Allah, Part 2

This is the second part of a series which reports the events of a battle on 04 April 05.

I also received another gift from a supporter at BooksForSoldiers.com (link to the right), Thanks Janel! I encourage all my readers who wish to support other soldiers, to check out the web site and do what you can.

Happy Memorial Day.




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Timberwolf 6, ODA, and Red elements passed a car that had been previously engaged by our coalition fires and continued to the southeast. As we moved, both Green elements pushed southwest into the field towards the enemy’s flank while the main body pushed south along the roadway. Around 1600 we were taking fires from the southeast, southwest, and from the irrigation ditches from the northeast, which again consisted of small arms, RPG, and mortar fires.

At 1610 ODA reported that two OH 58Ds were on the way to provide air support. At this time Timberwolf 6 gave all of us an order to disengage and regroup at the northern end of the battle. At 1632 hrs we shifted and called the remainder of 1st and 4th Companies, from 6th BN forward from our initial OBJ. After the remaining 6th BN troops arrived at the engagement area, we gathered their commanders, gave them a situational assessment and suggested a course of action.

The AIF had fallen back to prepared positions around NB 077845 and NB 075846. At 1638 hours, ODA coordinated an air strike with an F18 which dropped a 500 pound bomb on the cars/trucks located approximately NB 078843. The bomb was very effective sending pieces of shrapnel flying. We continued providing suppressive fires, while a second air strike was conducted by two OH 58Ds using hell-fire missiles and machine gun-fire on the area surrounding the cars/trucks, located behind heavy brush.

At approximately 1650 hrs, members of 1st and 4th company lined up along the road orientated southwest and began dismounted ground operations. Both companies advanced less than 100 meters before enemy fires came from the southwest forcing most soldiers to drop to the ground. Fires were returned in the direction of the AIF positions. At the same time, part of the IA force moving with ODA, and 6th BN MiTT pushed southwest toward AIF positions clearing the irrigation trenches using IMT maneuvers. During our offensive assault we were taking heavy AK-47 fires and grenades.

Four 6th BN Mitt team members and 12-14 IA soldiers were wounded during the assault to clear the trenches. Re-enforcements were pushed out on the ground along with M1114s maneuvering to provide suppressive fires upon the trench line where the AIF fires were concentrated. At 1730 with coordinated IMT tactics from the ODA, 278th, and MiTT soldiers, several AIF were killed using close combat fires. Medics and other soldiers moved forward to aid the wounded. Litters were brought back to the Casualty Collection Point. SFC Rader and I helped with the wounded under SGT Dalton’s direction. We both assisted SGT Dalton with CPR on SSG Kennedy. SFC Rader and I helped with the landing and the moving of the WIAs, onto the helicopter. Bullets were whistling through the air all around us. My gunner never stopped watching and covering us during the fight while we were dismounted, assisting others.

Medevac was called in through 1/278 RCT Commander LT COL Hart (Warrior 6). Medevac arrived around 1810 and landed in a very hot LZ. Several soldiers helped load SSG Dill, SSG Kennedy and other seriously wounded soldiers. The bird flew out at 1825. The second helicopter came at approximately 1835 and lifted the remaining wounded out within 10-15 minutes.




To be continued............

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